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After a nearly grueling split shift at work today, up at 6am and off to work from 8-1, returning from 5-8pm, I was startlingly still ready to make dinner for my wife and I, the latter of which is quite content to simply hardboil an egg for dinner if I’m unable to cook.

Today Pato, a fabulous cook and gardener, pickler and foodie told me about this piece of Akaushi beef he had eaten for lunch the other day. He had selected the flatiron steak cut, perhaps as thin as a little finger, and marvelously tender and marbled. He wouldn’t shut up about it until he directed me to the meat counter to show me the beef in question.

Wow, it was pretty. Still, at $17/lb it wasn’t cheap, so I got about a half pound sliced into three small rectangular pieces. Once home later that night, I mandolined some onion very thinly and cooked them in a skillet with thyme and olive oil, as well as a dab of butter. Once the onions were browned and sweet, I removed them to a small cup and put in the first of two pieces of meat for dinner.

First was a smallish duck breast, seasoned with salt and pepper, and thrown into the now-wiped-clear skillet to sear in its own rendered fat. Once I flipped it, I added the small piece of Akaushi beef and started to cook that. I figured the duck would finish roughly about the same time as the beef would, and yes…it did.

I popped them both out of the skillet onto a cutting board to rest under foil and I quickly started on the whiskey fig sauce for the duck. Why whiskey fig? Hmm, figs are in season and that bottle of Jamison’s hadn’t even been cracked yet. I sautéed some white onion in the rendered duck and beef fat, added a quarter cup of chicken broth, then a shot splash of the whiskey. I finally added the freshest fig I had, sliced and drizzling sweetness into the pan, and cooked it down until…well…there was the Whiskey Fig Duck Sauce.

Not sure what else to call it.

I put the beef now sliced in smaller pieces on one side of the plate with the caramelized onions nestled beside them, and on the other, the duck breast slices, covered with the whiskey fig sauce. I thought it was a creditable meal, quickly done and very simply delicious.

Wifey was floored, sat back enjoying the flavors in her mouth from the savory beef and the sweeter duck. She started thinking how she wanted to serve this to our friends first chance. I was very happy with my success, and enjoyed her pleasure.

No picture, as you can see. Sigh. Another meal lost into the mists of legend, I suppose.

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